Spring 2018 Faculty & Staff Innovation Grants

Funded projects

The Shenkman Career Services Fund (SCSF) Faculty and Staff Innovation grants provide funding for GW faculty and staff to create professional and career development activities for GW undergraduate and graduate students. The Fund provides funding to offset costs associated with infusing career-related materials into existing or new class curricula and/or departmental, program or school-based initiatives. Applications are reviewed and allocated by the Development and Philanthropy Project Team of the university-wide Career Services Council.


The Person and the Therapist: Cultivating Lifelong Professional Development in Counselors

Mina Barimany, Ph.D., Clinical Supervisor/Program Coordinator, Graduate School of Education and Human Development

Project Abstract:
This program aims to facilitate and enhance the personal and professional development in the counselor’s formative years—the clinical internship. After successful completion of the internship, counselors typically graduate and begin the search for paid employment. This program aims to make this process less difficulty by providing a "roadmap" for personal and professional development beyond graduate school.

Funds will be used on materials.


Getting the Most Out of your Summer Workshops

Mary Denmon, Academic Advisor, School of Engineering and Applied Science

Project Abstract:
This program is intended to provide an opportunity for sophomore students in SEAS to plan career and professional development related tasks to accomplish during their summer break. Many students will be working in internships or research opportunities and can learn how to get the most out of their experience. For other students who have not secured internships or research and have other summer jobs or other plans, they can identify goals to further their professional development. There will be several "lunch and learn" roundtable sessions where students can come and talk with students, faculty, and staff regarding their summer plans. The sessions would be clustered by major so that students can identify specific skills or goals relevant to their field.

Funds will be spent on refreshments.


Decoding the Job Search for Future Science Educators

Katie DeVeau, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Project Abstract:
The goal of these series of workshops is to help doctoral students in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences navigate this transition from candidate to faculty members in teacher-heavy academic position by addressing topics related to the teaching academic job search: identifying differences between teaching-focused vs. research-focused jobs, decoding a job announcement and preparing a cover letter, and preparing a teaching philosophy statement.

Funds will be spent on materials and refreshments.


GW CCAS Course Catalog with Identifiable Professional Competencies

Gilda Mossadegh, Director of Advising for the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

 Project Abstract:
The Columbian College of Arts and Sciences (CCAS) Undergraduate Advising Office is funding a GW undergraduate student intern to oversee and create a catalog of CCAS course offerings with educational outcomes that are in alignment with GW’s Professional Competencies (e.g., Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving, Communication, Teamwork and Collaboration, Leadership, Professionalism, Global Perspective, Technology and Information Management, and Career Management.) The project will be annually updated and serve as a resource to support the professional and career development of all GW CCAS students as well as provide guidance for the academic and career advisors that serve them. Additionally, the catalog will be a useful resource for CCAS Advising Office’s future peer advising pilot program.

Funds will be spent on student support.


Community Engagement through STEM:  An Exploration of Informal Education

Zackary Pekor, Senior Program Associate for GWTeach, Graduate School of Education and Human Development

 Project Abstract:
The GWTeach Program seeks to provide high quality educational experiences to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) pre-service teachers in order to create a well-rounded teaching workforce. Through collaboration with the Honey W. Nashman Center for Civic Engagement and Public Service, a District of Columbia Public School will be selected to be a pilot site for a GWU/DCPS Family STEM Night. The Family STEM Night will be facilitated by students enrolled in GWTeach's "Topics in STEM Education" course, who will be learning about cultural competency, differentiated learning, and barriers to STEM education. In conjunction to their regular course assignments, students will also take part in hands-on field work exercises. Ultimately, students will be able to apply theory and course discussions to the "real world" through the coordination, community engagement/organizing, and execution of this STEM event.

Funds will be spent on materials and refreshments.


Designing Your New Life

Denita Takemoto, Business Management & Analysis Group, School of Business

Program Abstract:
Stanford University Design Center educators, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans published “Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-lived, Joyful Life” which has been wildly popular with students at that Silicon Valley school. Our students have the same concerns – where is my life going – what is my purpose...Using their book as the cornerstone for the seminar, participants will be guided through the steps of design thinking and then building a plan based on their values and dreams. Students will complete four sessions having identified and refined their personal passion, a professional interest with a career focus. The stated goal will be to help them identify a fulfilling life’s work and enable them to build a plan toward their life’s work.

Funds will be spent on materials and refreshments.


Lunch with a Lawyer Career Services

Marcus Ware, Assistant Director of Advising and Pre-Law Advisor, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

Program Abstract:
The project will expose students interested in legal careers to practicing attorneys who will provide insight into their specialty areas. By providing an informal opportunity to engage with attorneys, students can learn more about the variety of career pathways available to them, and receive a unique opportunity to ask questions about law school preparation, career readiness, and other aspects of legal practice. The events will be open to all undergraduate students and will take place on the Foggy Bottom campus in Phillips Hall. A lunch will also be hosted on the Mount Vernon campus.

Funds will be spent on refreshments.